The Little Things Make It Better

Making it better, one little event at a time.
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Posts tagged "lgbt"

kiriamaya:

[content note: transmisogyny, misgendering, rape]

I am getting more than a little tired of “allies” who only think of trans women as women until it becomes inconvenient for them and their view of gender.

You know the type:

“I know trans women are women, but gender-segregated bathrooms exist for a reason.”

“I know trans women are women, but it will dilute our message if we stop talking about women in terms of vaginas (or vice versa).”

“I know trans women are women, but women have a right to their own spaces free of any masculine energy.”

“I know trans women are women, but they obviously don’t have any right to call themselves lesbians.”

“I know trans women are women, but you have to understand that your presence could be triggering to rape survivors.”

“I know trans women are women, but I have to question the sexuality of any guy who goes out with one.”

“I know trans women are women, but you have male privilege so you can’t possibly understand what women go through.”

“I know trans women are women, but this is a women’s shelter, so we can’t help you here.”

And so on, and so forth. If you’re a trans woman, you’ve probably heard a ton more examples.

And the thing is, I don’t think that most of these people are being deliberately disingenuous (one glaring exception, of course, being a certain radscum lady who shall remain nameless); I think they’re telling the truth as they see it. I think they really do think of trans women as women.

Except when they don’t.

Except when they feel like it would be too hard to reframe an issue in order to include us.

Except when their own unexamined prejudices come to the fore and dominate their approach to an issue.

Except when they realize that walking their talk requires a far more radical shift in their understanding of gender than they are prepared for, or than they ever wanted to attempt.

And so they decide that it’s easier to just revoke our identities situationally — to say that, yes, we’re women, and we’re just as much women as cis women are, but we’re still somehow not woman enough to fit their views, their spaces, their institutions.

It’s bullshit. But it’s bullshit that’s all too common. And it hurts.

(via ladybuglights)

pflagmom:

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO DONATE. PFLAG mom is pleading for your help- $5, $10, $25, anything- it adds up and it all matters. We’re in a financial crisis and if we don’t raise $800 in 2 weeks we may have to give up the battle to get this on the next ballot. You see the stories of states passing…

(via pflagmom)

boyprincessdiaries:

Muslims for Progressive Values is guided by the following ten principles. Each branch of the tree in our logo represents MPV’s ten principles rooted in Islam.

  1. Identity: We accept as Muslim anyone who identifies as such. The veracity and integrity of that claim is between the individual and God, and is not a matter for the state nor an issue which other individuals can or should judge.
  2. Equality: We affirm the equal worth of all human beings, regardless of race, sex, gender, ethnicity, nationality, creed, sexual orientation, or ability. We are committed to work toward societies that ensure social, political, educational, and economic opportunities for all.
  3. Separation of Religious and State Authorities: We believe that freedom of conscience is not only essential to all human societies but integral to the Qur’anic view of humanity. We believe that secular government is the only way to achieve the Islamic ideal of freedom from compulsion in matters of faith.
  4. Freedom of Speech: We support freedom of expression and freedom of dissent, whether political, artistic, social or religious, even when that expression may be offensive and that dissent may be considered blasphemous. No one should be legally prosecuted, imprisoned or detained for declaring or promoting unpopular opinions.
  5. Universal Human Rights: We affirm our commitment to social, economic and environmental justice. We believe that the full self-realization of all people, in a safe and sustainable world, is a prerequisite for freedom, civility, and peace. We support efforts for universal health care, universal public education, the protection of our environment, and the eradication of poverty.
  6. Women’s Rights: We support women’s agency and self-determination in every aspect of their lives. We believe in women’s full participation in society at every level. We affirm our commitment to reproductive justice and empowering women to make healthy decisions regarding their bodies, sexuality and reproduction. 
  7. LGBTQ Rights: We endorse the human and civil rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer (LGBTIQ) individuals. We support full equality and inclusion of all individuals, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity, in society and in the Muslim community. We affirm our commitment to ending discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.
  8. Critical Analysis and Interpretation: We call for critical engagement with Islamic scripture, traditional jurisprudence, and current Muslim discourses. We believe that critical thinking is essential to spiritual development. We promote interpretations that reflect basic Qur’anic principles of tolerance, inclusiveness, mercy, compassion, and fairness.
  9. CompassionWe affirm that justice and compassion should be the guiding principles for all aspects of human conduct. We repudiate militarism and violence, whether on an individual, organizational, or national level.
  10. Diversity: We embrace religious pluralism and the diversity of inspirations that motivate people to embrace social justice. We believe that one’s religion is not the exclusive source of truth. As such, we will engage with a diversity of philosophical and spiritual traditions in pursuit of a more just, peaceful and sustainable world.

[Bolding mine]

(via queermuslims)

thetrevorproject:

The Trevor Project Responds to Unanimous DOMA Ruling

Today, a three-judge panel from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit unanimously ruled that Section Three of the so-called Defense of Marriage Act, which discriminates against the marriages of same-sex couples at the federal level, is unconstitutional. Abbe Land, Executive Director and CEO of The Trevor Project, the nation’s leading provider of crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning teens and young adults issued the following statement:

“Today’s landmark decision illustrates how far America has come since the Defense of Marriage Act was passed in 1996. The First Circuit court’s ruling has shown Americans that the U.S. government values and supports the marriages of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people. This affirmation sends a message of hope to youth that they can dream about a future of full equality.”

Oh. My. God.

lesbiannextdoor:

Marriage Proposal of the Day: In what is believed to be the first proposal of marriage between two gay men — and war vets — on a U.S. military base, Navy vet Cory Huston asked Marine Avarice Guerrero to marry him Tuesday at Camp Pendleton in San Diego. Here’s the story:
Under a bright Southern California sky at Camp Pendleton’s Camp Del Mar near Oceanside, California, a full two hours before his boyfriend’s return from the badlands of Afghanistan, Cory Huston waited nervously. Huston, who was discharged under the former Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy, chain smoked as he rehearsed the simple proposal he would deliver when Guerrero would arrive.
Finally, luggage in tow, Guerrero emerged with a smile on his face. Upon seeing Huston, Guerrero dropped his bags; aimed a kiss toward Huston’s lips; and opened his arms to his boyfriends waiting embrace. The time and distance of 10 months’ separation evaporated in a public show of affection that less than a year ago would have been cause for court martial. After a few minutes of emotional holding and kissing, Huston went anxiously down on one knee; looked up at Guerrero, who was dressed from head to toe in military fatigues; and produced an engagement ring and the time-honored phrase, “Will you marry me?”
Huston’s mild tremble, a result of hours and days of anticipation about this day, was quickly quieted by the one word every hopeful fiancé wants to hear: “Yes.”

lesbiannextdoor:

Marriage Proposal of the Day: In what is believed to be the first proposal of marriage between two gay men — and war vets — on a U.S. military base, Navy vet Cory Huston asked Marine Avarice Guerrero to marry him Tuesday at Camp Pendleton in San Diego. Here’s the story:

Under a bright Southern California sky at Camp Pendleton’s Camp Del Mar near Oceanside, California, a full two hours before his boyfriend’s return from the badlands of Afghanistan, Cory Huston waited nervously. Huston, who was discharged under the former Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy, chain smoked as he rehearsed the simple proposal he would deliver when Guerrero would arrive.

Finally, luggage in tow, Guerrero emerged with a smile on his face. Upon seeing Huston, Guerrero dropped his bags; aimed a kiss toward Huston’s lips; and opened his arms to his boyfriends waiting embrace. The time and distance of 10 months’ separation evaporated in a public show of affection that less than a year ago would have been cause for court martial. After a few minutes of emotional holding and kissing, Huston went anxiously down on one knee; looked up at Guerrero, who was dressed from head to toe in military fatigues; and produced an engagement ring and the time-honored phrase, “Will you marry me?”

Huston’s mild tremble, a result of hours and days of anticipation about this day, was quickly quieted by the one word every hopeful fiancé wants to hear: “Yes.”

lgbtqgmh:

[God loves everyone whether you like it or not]

lgbtqgmh:

[God loves everyone whether you like it or not]

(via lgbtgivesmehope)

thisindieamericanlife:

the only movie to make me cry every time i watch it

Milk (2008)

Every. Damn. Time.